Maker of clothes, recipes, natural fabric dyeing, Gardener of veg, fruit and flowers.

Maker of clothes, recipes, natural fabric dyeing, Gardener of veg, fruit and flowers.

Growing and harvesting wild garlic

Here is a blog post on growing and harvesting wild garlic. Wild garlic is also known as Allium ursinum. Wild garlic is available in the woods however, one will need to forage for it. If you like in the woods foraging will much easy than in the city. One note to remember is that when foraging do lookout for similar plants that look the same as wild garlic. Failing to spot one can poison themselves easily. Do forage with an experienced guide if you are not sure. I have decided to try to grow it at home instead. Anything that is an edible easy to grow that will suit me.

Wild garlic is not available to buy easily from supermarkets but probably only from the farmer’s market. The leaves from wild garlic can be used in salads or stir-fries. The bulb and stems are also edible. From root to leaves. The flavours don’t survive in cook dishes for long so it’s best to add the in the end. They work well in pesto as well as anywhere that uses an onion as an ingredient.

Growing and harvesting wild garlic
Wild garlic leaves and flower

Growing and harvesting Wild garlic

In order to grow at home, one needs to either obtain some seeds or wild garlic bulbs. I bought the bulbs online in September come spring they are now flowering. To grow from seed sow the seeds from April o June. They will need 15- 20 degrees Celcius to germinate. It takes about a week to 10 days for seedlings to appear. Once the seedlings are mature transfer the to a growing place with around 10 cm apart. They grow best in clumps rather than rows. Grow in a good well drain soil in a sunny spot.

Growing and harvesting wild garlic
Wild garlic plant

When the leaves are ready to harvest when they are formed as above picture cut them at the base. The leaves will rapidly grow back. It can be cut several times to give it a continuous harvest. Plants that are grown from seed should be left alone for the first year. This is to allow for the roots to be established.

Thank you for dropping by. Here is another blog post on growing purple garlic flowers.

growing and harvesting wild garlic


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